Gulf Of Maine
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Sea Life & Aquarium Substrates

Sea life from the Northern Atlantic Ocean. 50 degree F salt water species. Gulf of Maine Inc. supplies sea life, beach plants, and aquarium substrates from Maine, collected by hand.

Aquarium substrates

Arthropods

Bony fishes

Brachiopods

Bryozoa

Cartilaginous fishes

Cnidaria

Echinoderms

Gulf of Maine assortments

Macroalgae

Molluscs

Plankton

Saltwater plants

Sponges

Tunicates

Worms

Dog Whelk (Thais lapillus)

Dog Whelk (Thais lapillus)

from 5.00

Common name: Atlantic dogwinkle, dog whelk

Scientific name:  Thais lapillus

Locations:  mid to low tide in among rocks and seaweed beds

Seasonality:  available year round

Colors:  white, white & black striped, brown, tan

Size:  1"

Collected:  by hand

Quantity:  sold by the each

per pack:
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 Several dogwinkles on an intertidal rock.

Several dogwinkles on an intertidal rock.

Tidepool Tim says,  “Dogwinkles are an interesting snail because they live in the middle of the intertidal zone.  These are predators that feed on other mollusks like blue mussels, periwinkles or crustaceans like barnacles.  They use their toothed tongue or radula to bore a hole into the shell to access the soft parts of their prey. When we need to collect dogwinkles we search the rocks under the largest beds of rockweed.  Groups of dogwinkles are scattered among these beds - it is kind of hit-or-miss. Dogwinkles are great aquarium specimens and seem to live for extended periods of time on the glass sides of our tanks. Seagulls seem to be the biggest predator on this type of snail. We have found dead dogwinkles that are cemented to rocks by the byssal threads of blue mussels.  It is thought that mussels lash them down with their threads as a way to prevent predation. The winkle, once latched into place, cannot move to feed or get to water eventually will die.”