Gulf Of Maine
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Sea Life & Aquarium Substrates

Sea life from the Northern Atlantic Ocean. 50 degree F salt water species. Gulf of Maine Inc. supplies sea life, beach plants, and aquarium substrates from Maine, collected by hand.

Aquarium substrates

Arthropods

Bony fishes

Brachiopods

Bryozoa

Cartilaginous fishes

Cnidaria

Echinoderms

Gulf of Maine assortments

Macroalgae

Molluscs

Plankton

Saltwater plants

Sponges

Tunicates

Worms

Bladder Wrack (Fucus vesiculosis)

Bladder Wrack (Fucus vesiculosis)

from 20.00

Common name:  bladderwrack

Scientific name: Fucus vesiculosis

Location:  rocky shores, ledges, mid to high tide range

Seasonality:  Available year round in great abundance

Colors: brown, tan, yellow, or dark green

Size:   fronds vary from 3" up to 3' long

Collected: hand harvested with a knife

Quantity:  1 pint volume

per pack:
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 Bladderwrack laying over  Ascophyllum nodosum .

Bladderwrack laying over Ascophyllum nodosum.

Tidepool Tim says,  “This leafy seaweed is often called "rockweed" but is quite different from the more prevalent seaweed, knotted wrack (Ascophyllum) on our rocky Maine coastlines. Though sometimes we find it in large beds, it seems to colonize the intertidal in a haphazard and scattered way on small rocks, boulders, and ledgy outcrops. Bladderwrack is a very tough & leafy seaweed with literally hundreds of small bladders along the fronds. In the summer months, enlarged bladders at the frond tips exude their spawn (a jelly-like substance) and this is how new wrack plants are produced. Tidepooling kids love to squeeze these bladders and squirt the liquid on each other with great delight! Periwinkle snails, and amphipods hide within or under the wrack at low tide using the plant as shelter from the hot sun or cold winter temps. Small specimens of wrack attached to rocks make a great addition to any cold-water aquarium - this is a tough & hardy seaweed that survives very well and provides habitat for various invertebrates."

Spiral wrackFucus spiralis, is also available.  This 'first-cousin' to bladderwrack is found on open ledges in areas of high tidal current.  We collect ours in our locally-famous area called 'Reversing Falls'.  Contact us if you're looking for spiral in particular.”