Gulf Of Maine
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Sea Life & Aquarium Substrates

Sea life from the Northern Atlantic Ocean. 50 degree F salt water species. Gulf of Maine Inc. supplies sea life, beach plants, and aquarium substrates from Maine, collected by hand.

Aquarium substrates

Arthropods

Bony fishes

Brachiopods

Bryozoa

Cartilaginous fishes

Cnidaria

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Gulf of Maine assortments

Macroalgae

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Saltwater plants

Sponges

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Crumb of Bread Sponge (Halichondria panacea)

Crumb of Bread Sponge (Halichondria panacea)

from 22.00

Common name: crumb sponge, crumb of bread sponge

Scientific name:  Halichondria panacea

Locations: lower intertidal on undersides of large rocks or amid kelp holdfasts

Seasonality:  available year round

Colors:  yellow and green colors

Size:  clumps of sponge are typically 3 - 6" in size

Collected:  by hand

Quantity:  sold by the clump

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 This photo shows a crumb of bread sponge which a seaweed plant has created a holdfast with.

This photo shows a crumb of bread sponge which a seaweed plant has created a holdfast with.

Tidepool Tim says,  “Crumb of bread is the most common sponge one will see in the tidepools around Cobscook bay in eastern Maine where I do my collecting.  It can be found as a mat or layer on the undersides of large stones. Other times it comes ashore having grown into the crevices amidst laminaria kelp holdfasts and other times it is just a thick carpet on the sea floor where blood stars, sea urchins, Irish moss, rock gunnels and other specimens are all in close proximity.  The larger holes or oscula are irregular across the surface and usually project up from the sponge perhaps 1/4" to 1/2" projections. Sometimes this sponge has a type of algae that grows inside its spicules - this will make the otherwise yellow sponge kind of green. Crumb sponge adds great color and nice structure in a coldwater aquarium.  It seems to survive quite well for months or even years in good clean sea water. Given its name - it really does look like a big gob of wet bread - even breaks off in clumps!”