Gulf Of Maine
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Sea Life & Aquarium Substrates

Sea life from the Northern Atlantic Ocean. 50 degree F salt water species. Gulf of Maine Inc. supplies sea life, beach plants, and aquarium substrates from Maine, collected by hand.

Aquarium substrates

Arthropods

Bony fishes

Brachiopods

Bryozoa

Cartilaginous fishes

Cnidaria

Echinoderms

Gulf of Maine assortments

Macroalgae

Molluscs

Plankton

Saltwater plants

Sponges

Tunicates

Worms

Gulf of Maine Bony Fish (4 Species)

Gulf of Maine Bony Fish (4 Species)

195.00

Gulf of Maine Bony Fish (Osteichthyes - 4 species) may include:

Rock gunnel (Pholis gunnelis), sea snail (Liparidae), lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus), sea raven

Common name:  sea raven

Scientific name: Hemipterus spp.

Locations:  inshore and offshore

Seasonality:  available all year

Colors:  red, purple, brown, yellow-brown

Size: 20”

Collected:  by fishing line

Quantity: by the each

Common name:  rock gunnel

Scientific name:  Pholis gunnellus

Locations:  shallow waters of the coast, under rocks in small puddles, in cracks and crevices

Seasonality:  available all year

Color:  brown with a row of 9 - 13 dark spots

Size:  5” - 8”

Collected:  by hand

Quantity:  sold by the each

Common name:  sea snail

Scientific name: Liparidae

Locations:  inshore (fall) and offshore (summer)

Seasonality:  available all year

Colors:  dark brown

Size: 5”

Collected:  by hand attached to weights or floats

Quantity: by the each

Common name:  lumpfish

Scientific name:  Cyclopterus lumpus

Locations:  seaweed beds as juveniles, open water as adults

Seasonality:  February - June when they move to shallow waters for spawning

Colors:  green, blue, gray, brown, males red during mating season

Size:  8” - 11”

Collected:  fishing line

Quantity:  sold by the each

Quantity:
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Tidepool Tim says, "Saltwater bony fish (Osteichthyes) are fish that have an internal, mineralized skeleton. This is the largest vertebrate class with over 29,000 species! The variety in behavior and morphology is truly astounding. The species in this selection are compatible with being kept captive in an aquarium as bottom dwellers. They would also make great subjects for a comparative vertebrate anatomy dissection lab. Investigate whether or not these fish have swim bladders, for example. Draw a phylogeny for these fish and then discover their difference in context."