Gulf Of Maine
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Sea Life & Aquarium Substrates

Sea life from the Northern Atlantic Ocean. 50 degree F salt water species. Gulf of Maine Inc. supplies sea life, beach plants, and aquarium substrates from Maine, collected by hand.

Aquarium substrates

Arthropods

Bony fishes

Brachiopods

Bryozoa

Cartilaginous fishes

Cnidaria

Echinoderms

Gulf of Maine assortments

Macroalgae

Molluscs

Plankton

Saltwater plants

Sponges

Tunicates

Worms

Rock Barnacle (Balanus balanoides)

Rock Barnacle (Balanus balanoides)

from 10.00

Common name:  rock barnacle

Scientific name:  Balanus balanoides

Locations:  “glued” to pilings, floats, rocks, boats, sea creatures of the intertidal zone

Seasonality:  available all year

Color:  off-white

Size:  1/2” – 3/4”

Collected:  by hand

Quantity:  sold by the each

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Rock barnacles cling to rocks and make a living filtering food from the cold Atlantic Ocean waters. Join Tidepool Tim as he inspects their life strategies on a local beach. See how barnacles live and keep from getting crowded out or eaten by predators.

 Rock barnacles on a blue mussel, all on shale substrate.

Rock barnacles on a blue mussel, all on shale substrate.

Tidepool Tim says,  “Barnacles produce their own super-cement, and never move a day in their lives! They’re very stubborn crustaceans. They even molt! They close their shells at low tide, then open their mouths to feed when submerged in water. Feather-like feedings legs come out of their mouths and collect phytoplankton from the surrounding water. The legs also act as gills and gather dissolved oxygen. Take a close look at a barnacle underwater, then move your hand near it and watch the feeding legs retract. Barnacles don’t have eyes, but they can sense the change in light exposure using photoreceptor cells.”