Gulf Of Maine
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Sea Life & Aquarium Substrates

Sea life from the Northern Atlantic Ocean. 50 degree F salt water species. Gulf of Maine Inc. supplies sea life, beach plants, and aquarium substrates from Maine, collected by hand.

Aquarium substrates

Arthropods

Bony fishes

Brachiopods

Bryozoa

Cartilaginous fishes

Cnidaria

Echinoderms

Gulf of Maine assortments

Macroalgae

Molluscs

Plankton

Saltwater plants

Sponges

Tunicates

Worms

Waved Whelk (Buccinum undatum)

Waved Whelk (Buccinum undatum)

from 15.00

Common name: waved whelk    

Scientific name:  Buccinum undatum

Locations:  low water mark and deeper, on mussel beds and rocky shores

Seasonality:  available year round

Colors:  tan shells with creamy white foot, sometimes green with algal coating

Size:  2"  - 3"

Collected:  by hand or in whelk traps

Quantity:  sold by the each

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 The speckled snail is visible as it moves across a surface.  It appears there is a jingle shell attached to the back end of its soft body.

The speckled snail is visible as it moves across a surface.  It appears there is a jingle shell attached to the back end of its soft body.

 Whelk ( Buccinum   undat um) egg mass attached to a kelp holdfast.

Whelk (Buccinum undatum) egg mass attached to a kelp holdfast.

Tidepool Tim says,  “Waved whelks are like mini conch snails. This is the largest whelk we have in Maine - the only snail that grows larger is the moon snail. Whelks are commonly caught in lobster traps since they are attracted to the smelly bait. Whelks use their toothed radula to grind up the skins, cartilage, and bones left in the bait bags after the lobsters & sand fleas have eaten off all the flesh. In this case - they really help to recycle these substances back into the food chain. Whelks have a large egg-sized shell that has little 'waves' along the surface - hence the name.

Whelks have a large white spotted food and a long white tube-like siphon that protrudes out of the shell. Attached at the end of the foot is a round, finger-nail like operculum. This serves as a trap-door to seal the snail in its shell for protection.  In the spring and summer waved whelks produce large clusters of eggs on rocks and kelp holdfasts. These each hatch into tiny little whelks in the summer months. They look like seed pods of some garden plant. Once all the eggs have hatched parts of the egg mass sometimes wash up on local beaches. Each egg sac has a tiny hole in it through which the young snail exited the shell. Whelks are growing in popularity as a seafood product in Maine. Some folks like to cook them and then pickle them like they would eggs with vinegar and garlic - others are eaten in pasta dishes.”